Lotion does not harm consumers' health
Column:Industry News Time:2015-02-15
The American Association of Scientists and Health currently concludes that the liquid dry-cleaning agent perchloroethylene (also known as perc or PCE) does not pose a risk to human health under normal use levels.

The American Association of Scientists and Health currently concludes that the liquid dry-cleaning agent perchloroethylene (also known as perc or PCE) does not pose a risk to human health under normal use levels.
Some radical people often warn consumers to dry out laundry before putting it on to remove any residual perchloroethylene from the laundry. The article "Scientific Facts about Dry Cleaning Agents" mentions that consumers need not worry about the inferred health effects of dry cleaning clothes and living near a dry cleaning store.
      After claiming that dry cleaning is harmful to health, a new report was obtained after examining the relevant data based on its toxic effects and carcinogenic potential. Those who work in an environment where perchloroethylene exceeds the standard will experience nausea, headaches, and dizziness, but these symptoms do not appear at normal levels.
The conclusion that perchloroethylene is carcinogenic comes mainly from research data that female mice who have lived in an environment exceeding perchloroethylene standards for life will develop liver cancer and male mice will develop kidney cancer. In fact, it is important that humans and tooth animals metabolize perchloroethylene differently. Data from epidemiological studies do not support the conclusion that perchloroethylene is carcinogenic, especially when consumers use it at low concentrations.
      After investigating the possibility of related hazards caused by perchloroethylene, some government agencies believe that to a certain extent, perchloroethylene will not be harmful. Analysis of most completed data shows that the allegations that perchloroethylene is harmful to the public are inaccurate.
      President of the American Association for Science and Health, Dr. Elizabeth Whelan said: "With careful analysis of scientific data, perchloroethylene is not harmful to the public.